2 million tons of CO2 saved every year by converting ag waste to auto fuel

LANCASTER, Pa., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — An independent assessor recently verified that each New Energy Blue biomass refinery can be expected to keep 2,000,000 tons of carbon dioxide pollution out of the atmosphere every year.  According to Thomas Corle, CEO of New Energy Blue, the refineries will turn grain-harvest leftovers, such as wheat straw and corn stalks, into a carbon-neutral auto fuel selling at a premium in California and other states with tough clean air and low carbon standards.

Half of the CO2 saved comes from replacing gasoline, the other half is sequestered by modern farming practices.

“To put our carbon figures into perspective,” says Corle, “Tesla, a trillion dollar company, has sold about a million battery-operated vehicles to date. But our market is the other 270,000,000 cars on American highways, starting with the 14,500,000 now in California.

“Because we’re planning five refineries in five years,

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Will Tighter European CO2 Rules Herald A New Electric Era, Or Bankrupt The Industry?

The European Union (EU) is expected to tighten the already harsh 2030 limit on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for autos, and given the current rules already call for the equivalent of an average 92 miles per U.S. gallon, this is causing some consternation among auto manufacturers.

Europe’s political leaders are setting idealistic goals which some consider impossible to achieve for manufacturers, who have to remain in post and operate in the real world. Some experts say this will bankrupt the industry while making it impossible for average earners to own new cars. Supporters of the tightening say it is crucial for climate change goals, and electric car technology is advancing at such a pace that a smooth transition from internal combustion engine (ICE) is possible.  

The manufacturers themselves aren’t publicly condemning the plan, which is designed to force Europeans into electric cars whether they like it or can afford

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