Audi says plant in Mexico remains open, debt dispute denied by company

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – A Mexican auto plant belonging to German carmaker Audi NSUG.DE remains open and did not close following a dispute over unpaid bills that the firm denies, as was reported by local media, an official with the company told Reuters on Saturday.

The plant is located in the central state of Puebla. Media had reported officials from the local municipality shut the facility on Friday after several hours of failed talks to resolve a dispute over an alleged 90 million pesos ($4.3 million) in outstanding debts on items including local property taxes and water bills.

“There was never any closure,” said Christine Kuhlmeyer, a communications official with Audi Mexico.

“We comply on time with our obligations,” she added.

Asked about the figures circulating in local media about the allegation of unpaid debts, Kuhlmeyer said she could not comment on any specific amounts, but said plant representatives would

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Lincoln company to provide state with mobile COVID-19 testing trailers | Local Business News



Pacific Engineering

Nebraska is buying 10 mobile units from Pacific Engineering Inc., including five of the trailers shown here, to deploy as mobile COVID-19 testing units across the state for Test Nebraska.




Even though it doesn’t feel like it right now — with summerlike temperatures in the 80s — winter is coming.

And COVID-19 doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon.

That presents a problem for Nebraska’s mobile testing operations, especially those set up in tents outside.

Earlier this week, Bryan Health moved its COVID-19 testing site from a tent at its Bryan LifePointe center near 27th Street and Pine Lake Road, to a former auto repair shop at Antelope Valley Parkway and O Street so it could have a place more protected from the elements.

Test Nebraska has similar issues, often operating out of tents or, in the case of its Lincoln site, under a parking

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Governments Are Forcing People Into Dirty Company Cars

European taxpayers are paying €32 billion ($38 billion) each year on polluting petrol or diesel cars, according to a new study released this week by the environmental NGO Transport & Environment.

Six out of ten cars in Europe are owned by companies or organisations who give them to their employees to use. Almost all of these are powered by fossil fuels, the study finds, despite the increasing availability of electric vehicles. The 10 largest leasing companies alone – including BMW’s Alphabet and Daimler’s Athlon – cause 8% of EU car CO2 emissions because they are driven over twice as many miles as private cars, according to the study.

The problem is particularly acute in countries with high income tax that allow companies to pay employees with tax-free benefits instead of cash in order to lessen the heavy income

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Suffolk County wrongly held auto company vehicles, federal lawsuits say

Subsidiaries of three auto companies and a bank that makes auto loans each sued Suffolk County in federal court this week, alleging the county wrongly held seized vehicles in which the plaintiffs held an interest.

The lawsuits allege Suffolk wrongly charged them for towing and storage.

Manhattan-based lawyer Nicholas Duston, representing leasing or lending arms of Hyundai, Nissan and Toyota; and the bank, Manufacturers and Traders Trust; filed the lawsuits in Eastern District of New York in Central Islip.

It seeks unspecified damages and a permanent injunction against “unconstitutional practices” by Suffolk County. The suits do not say how many vehicles may have been improperly held but called the county’s practices “regular and systematic.”

Duston filed a similar complaint in June on behalf of Santander Consumer, alleging the county wrongly seized a vehicle for which the bank was lienholder.

Dennis Cohen, an attorney for Suffolk County in the lawsuit, did

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Lincoln company to provide state with mobile testing trailers | Local Business News



Pacific Engineering

Nebraska is buying 10 mobile units from Pacific Engineering Inc., including five of the trailers shown here, to deploy as mobile COVID-19 testing units across the state for Test Nebraska.




Even though it doesn’t feel like it right now — with summer-like temperatures in the 80s — winter is coming.

And COVID-19 doesn’t look like it’s going away anytime soon.

That presents a problem for Nebraska’s mobile testing operations, especially those set up in tents outside.

Earlier this week, Bryan Health moved its COVID-19 testing site from a tent at its Bryan LifePointe center near 27th Street and Pine Lake Road, to a former auto repair shop at Antelope Valley Parkway and O Street so it could have a place more protected from the elements.

Test Nebraska has similar issues, often operating out of tents or, in the case of its Lincoln site, under a parking

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Dallas company makes $135 million buyout bid for subprime auto lender

A Dallas company led by auto finance veteran Samuel Ellis is offering to buy out a California firm that specializes in subprime auto loans for $135 million.



a car is lined up in a parking lot: Rows of used cars sit on a lot in North Texas.


© Smiley N. Pool/Staff Photographer/The Dallas Morning News/TNS
Rows of used cars sit on a lot in North Texas.

Auto Experience Inc., which Ellis formed in 2018, said it made the all-cash bid in a letter to the board of directors of Consumer Portfolio Services Inc. after trading markets closed Wednesday. Its offer amounts to $6.18 a share — an 84% premium over where the Nasdaq-listed company’s stock ended Wednesday.

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The suitor gave CPS until Oct. 30 to respond.

Based in Irvine, Calif., CPS works with auto dealers to buy and service consumer loans, funding its purchases primarily through securitization markets. About 75% of its business is financing used car sales, and its customers often have limited credit histories or past

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Global Automobile Current Sensor Market 2020 Company Profiles, Key Strategic Moves and Developments, Operating Business Segments 2025

A recently announced report titled Global Automobile Current Sensor Market Growth 2020-2025 by MarketandResearch.biz aims to deliver a detailed investigation of all necessary data related to the global market. The report is specialized in-depth industry research detailing historical and current trends of the global Automobile Current Sensor market. These trends are anticipated for the market during the forecast period from 2020 to 2025. The report estimates the performance of the key players along with their new product launches. The report covers definitive information about the market including vertical, market size, and revenue estimation.

Further, all the information regarding global Automobile Current Sensor market competitors, growth rate, revenue ups and downs, regional players, industrial players, and applications has been mentioned in the report.  The study focuses on trends, market share, opportunities, and forecast market in terms of product types, by applications and major influencers. The report also studies factors such as

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Texas towing company auctioned off active-duty service members’ cars, feds allege in lawsuit

A Dallas-based towing company towed and then auctioned off vehicles belonging to members of the military while they were on active duty, the Justice Department alleges in a federal civil lawsuit filed Monday.

United Tows’ actions violated the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, a federal law that protects the finances of military members while they are serving, federal lawyers said.

The towing company does not have an attorney listed in court records. The company did not immediately respond to a voice mail seeking comment, and multiple phone numbers listed for its owner were out of service.

The lawsuit highlights the case of an airman who began basic training in August 2017 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

He arranged to leave his 1998 Toyota Corolla in the parking lot of a Lake Highlands martial-arts studio where he had been a teacher. Because he had ended his apartment lease he stored some personal

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The DOJ is going after a towing company for auctioning off active-duty service members’ cars

A Dallas-based towing company towed and then auctioned off vehicles belonging to members of the military while they were on active duty, the Justice Department alleges in a federal civil lawsuit filed Monday.

United Tows’ actions violated the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, a federal law that protects the finances of military members while they are serving, federal lawyers said.

The towing company does not have an attorney listed in court records. The company did not immediately respond to a voice mail seeking comment, and multiple phone numbers listed for its owner were out of service.

The lawsuit highlights the case of an airman who began basic training in August 2017 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

He arranged to leave his 1998 Toyota Corolla in the parking lot of a Lake Highlands martial-arts studio where he had been a teacher. Because he had ended his apartment lease he stored some personal

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Company reveals details for proposed used auto storage facility in Andover

Kyle Morel
 |  kmorel@njherald.com

ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — After months of delays, the Township Land Use Board was finally presented with details for a proposed Copart auto storage facility on Stickles Pond Road.

Copart officials provided about three hours of details Tuesday night in front of about 50 members of the public at the Hillside Park barn.

Copart seeks to buy about 100 acres on Stickles Pond Road, the site of the former Newton Airport, to build a facility to store its used vehicles until they are sold via auction, similar to its 200 other sites nationwide.

The township site would also include a 12,860-square-foot building and an 8-foot-tall perimeter fence.

Charles Eichman, Copart’s regional manager for New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia answered questions from attorney William Haggerty, representing the applicant, and from members of the board.

Attorney Elizabeth Durkin, who represents 17 township residents, also questioned Eichman. During Durkin’s

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