Trump’s offshore oil ban in SC also covers wind farms, feds say | News

Oil and gas drilling wasn’t the only thing halted by President Donald Trump’s recent order covering offshore South Carolina.

It also blocked the expansion of wind farm technology, which came as a surprise to state and coastal leaders.

“I think almost no one was expecting that it would affect offshore wind,” said Chris Carnevale of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. 

It’s a blow to a nascent industry in South Carolina, where some areas offshore of the northern half of the state have been flagged for future wind farms, though the government hasn’t started leasing waters yet.

“Oh, well that’s disappointing,” North Myrtle Beach Mayor Marilyn Hatley said upon hearing wind was included in the presidential order.

The beach town was opposed to fossil fuel extraction but passed a resolution years ago supporting wind technology and has two experimental turbines on land that power electric car charging stations. 

“We thought

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Texas towing company auctioned off active-duty service members’ cars, feds allege in lawsuit

A Dallas-based towing company towed and then auctioned off vehicles belonging to members of the military while they were on active duty, the Justice Department alleges in a federal civil lawsuit filed Monday.

United Tows’ actions violated the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, a federal law that protects the finances of military members while they are serving, federal lawyers said.

The towing company does not have an attorney listed in court records. The company did not immediately respond to a voice mail seeking comment, and multiple phone numbers listed for its owner were out of service.

The lawsuit highlights the case of an airman who began basic training in August 2017 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

He arranged to leave his 1998 Toyota Corolla in the parking lot of a Lake Highlands martial-arts studio where he had been a teacher. Because he had ended his apartment lease he stored some personal

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Dallas towing company auctioned off active-duty service members’ cars, feds allege in lawsuit

A Dallas-based towing company towed and then auctioned off vehicles belonging to members of the military while they were on active duty, the Justice Department alleges in a federal civil lawsuit filed Monday.

United Tows’ actions violated the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, a federal law that protects the finances of military members while they are serving, federal lawyers said.

The towing company does not have an attorney listed in court records. The company did not immediately respond to a voice mail seeking comment, and multiple phone numbers listed for its owner were out of service.

The lawsuit highlights the case of an airman who began basic training in August 2017 at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland.

He arranged to leave his 1998 Toyota Corolla in the parking lot of a Lake Highlands martial-arts studio where he had been a teacher. Because he had ended his apartment lease he stored some personal

Read More

Read More