FOCUS-U.S. auto suppliers scramble to fill factory jobs

By Ben Klayman

DETROIT, Oct 8 (Reuters)Millions of U.S. workers have lost their jobs to the pandemic, but in the auto industry, suppliers are scrambling to find enough people to staff production lines, resorting to such approaches as rewards for good attendance and at-work teachers to lure job seekers.

At auto parts maker Mobex Global, Chief Executive Joe Perkins said he is boosting pay and offering bonuses to help fill 80 job openings. His engineering and machining company is running more overtime to meet rising demand.

“It is the most critical issue in our company,” said Perkins, whose firm has 12 U.S. plants and counts General Motors Co GM.N and Ford Motor Co F.N among its customers.

“We’re using almost 10 staffing companies across the plants,” he told Reuters. “We’re using multiple jobs boards, ZipRecruiter, LinkedIn, Monster, local news stations, down to lawn signs, local papers, billboards,

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U.S. auto suppliers scramble to fill factory jobs

DETROIT (Reuters) – Millions of U.S. workers have lost their jobs to the pandemic, but in the auto industry, suppliers are scrambling to find enough people to staff production lines, resorting to such approaches as rewards for good attendance and at-work teachers to lure job seekers.

A production worker inspects parts for any quality issues at auto supplier Aludyne in Port Huron, Michigan, U.S., October 7, 2020. ALUDYNE/Rachael Waynick/Handout via REUTERS

At auto parts maker Mobex Global, Chief Executive Joe Perkins said he is boosting pay and offering bonuses to help fill 80 job openings. His engineering and machining company is running more overtime to meet rising demand.

“It is the most critical issue in our company,” said Perkins, whose firm has 12 U.S. plants and counts General Motors Co GM.N and Ford Motor Co F.N among its customers.

“We’re using almost 10 staffing companies across the plants,” he told

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Seven candidates are vying to fill John Lewis’s seat in a special election.

John Lewis’s tenure representing Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District spanned 33 years. His successor, at the most, can lay claim to the office for 97 days.

Still, seven candidates are running in a special election on Tuesday to serve out the remainder of Mr. Lewis’s term representing a district that covers parts of Atlanta and spreads into the suburbs.

Mr. Lewis, a pioneering figure in the civil rights movement who was regarded by colleagues as the “conscience of Congress,” died on July 17 of pancreatic cancer after holding his House seat for 17 terms.

The contenders in Tuesday’s election, with a mixed-party ballot, include five Democrats, one independent and a Libertarian. None of the candidates are on the November ballot that will decide who will be sworn into office in January for a full two-year term.

The process to replace Mr. Lewis was set in motion within hours of his death,

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